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How to Cook Peruvian Beans

This is how to cook Peruvian beans or canary beans on the stove soaked, in Instant Pot or in a slow cooker to tender with herbs and seasonings. Like our Northern beans recipe, this is the best way to cook dry beans to serve as a healthy side dish.

Peruvian Beans

Peruvian bean is a type of legume that is popular in Peruvian cuisine and other Latin American countries. Known for their creamy texture and rich, nutty flavor, they can be used in a variety of dishes, including soups, stews, salads, and side dishes. (affiliate links present)

Canary Beans

Are Canary Beans and Peruvian Beans the Same?

Yes! Canary is the most common type of Peruvian beans out there but there is a lima and black style out there too. We will show you here how to cook a canary bean recipe right here to tender and flavorful.

This is another name for these. A good source of protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals. They are a healthy addition to a balanced diet and are often used as a meat substitute in vegetarian and vegan dishes.

These come in various varieties, with some of the most common being canary beans, also known as frijol canario, Peruvian lima beans or pallar, and black beans style a.k.a. frijol negro. Each variety has its unique flavor and texture.

How to Cook Peruvian Beans

Peruvian Beans Recipe

These legumes are prized for their creamy and smooth texture when cooked. They can easily absorb the flavors of the ingredients they are cooked with, making them versatile in various recipes. With a rich, nutty flavor that can add depth and complexity to dishes. Their natural taste makes them an excellent choice for soups and stews.

The color of Peruvian beans varies depending on the variety. Dry canary beans are typically yellow, Peruvian lima beans are pale green, and Peruvian black beans are dark brown or black. Used to make inside dishes like “Tacu Tacu” (a mixture of beans and rice), “Carapulcra” (a stew made with dried potatoes and beans), and various soups and stews.

Usually soaked before cooking to soften them and reduce cooking time. They can be cooked on the stovetop, cooking dry beans in a pressure cooker, or in a slow cooker, depending on your preference and the recipe. We will explain all of them below in the printable recipe card and explanations below.

how to cook dry beans

How to Cook Peruvian Beans

These can be found in Latin American markets and some specialty grocery stores. In regions where they are less common, you may find them in dried or canned forms. Below we will share why it is best to start by soaking dry beans before cooking, and a variety of ways to make them wonderful.

I have found that starting from scratch is best because you know exactly what you are eating and can adjust the heat and seasonings to your liking. You can skip all the preservatives too which is great and for those who are watching their sodium intake they are much healthier this way as well.

Canned beans have a lot of hidden salt in them to preserve which you can reduce if you just add a bit at the beginning and end for seasoning purposes. It is easier than you think, really. Just remember to pour them into a bowl filled with water the night before and you’ll be set the next day for a side dish as is, to mash into refried beans or include ham hocks to make into a meal.

Canary Beans

How Long to Cook Peruvian Beans

Peruano beans or Mayocoba beans as you may be calling them to. Yes they do have quite a few names for these dry and cooked beans but that is why I am including them all here so we’re all on the same page friends… These can be cooked in a large pot as we did here, pressure cooked or slow cooked.

Peruvian Beans and Ham

If you want to slow cook this I would follow our Slow Cooker Ham and Beans directions. We like it with some meat but that could be left out if you preferred.

  • 1 bag Peruvian beans canary or Peruano beans may be on package, 2 lbs.
  • 6 slices bacon optional, diced
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 onion diced
  • 1 tbsp minced garlic
  • 1 tsp tomato paste
  • 1 bell pepper optional, diced
  • 1 tsp salt, cumin and oregano
  • 1/2 tsp pepper
  • 6 cups of water or broth

Place dry beans into a large mixing bowl and cover with cold water, about 3″ -4″ above the beans. Let beans soak overnight. When beans have soaked overnight, drain and rinse well.

In a large stock pot or dutch oven, add bacon and cook until crispy. Remove bacon from pan and drain on paper towels. Set aside. Add onion and oil and cook until onions begin to brown. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute. Stir in tomato paste, pepper and spices. Mix well.

Add soaked beans, cooked bacon, and water and mix to combine. Heat over medium high heat until boiling. Cover and reduce heat to medium low, cooking beans for 1 hour 20 minutes or so to 2 hours or until they are as tender as you’d like.

Peruvian Beans Recipe

Why you should soak dry beans

Soaking beans softens them and helps reduce the cooking time significantly. Beans that have been soaked typically cook faster and more evenly, saving you time and energy in the kitchen. This step helps break down these compounds, making the beans more digestible and reducing the likelihood of gas and bloating when consumed.

  1. They often have a smoother texture and a more consistent taste this way. They absorb flavors from the cooking liquid and any seasonings or aromatics you add, resulting in a richer, more flavorful dish.
  2. It helps ensure that they cook evenly. Unsoaked beans can sometimes have unevenly cooked centers, leading to a mix of undercooked and overcooked beans in the same pot.
    • if you really don’t have time for this though the only way to sorta counteract it is to cook under high pressure like our Pressure Cooker Pinto Beans directions state.
  3. This step can reduce the levels of anti-nutrients like lectins and tannins present in some too. These compounds can interfere with nutrient absorption in the body, so reducing their levels through soaking can make beans more nutritious.

While soaking won’t eliminate gas entirely (it’s a natural byproduct of bean digestion), it can help reduce gas production by making them more digestible. Discarding the soaking water and using fresh water for cooking can further reduce gas-producing compounds. Jump to recipe card below to try & give it a star rating for a side or make into refried beans recipe.

canary bean

How to You Store Beans after Cooking Them

Should you store cooked beans in liquid? Yes this is generally a good practice, as it helps maintain their moisture and flavor. However, there are some considerations to keep in mind such as if you plan to use the cooked dried beans within a few days, storing them in their cooking liquid in an airtight container in the refrigerator is perfectly fine. The cooking liquid can help prevent them from drying out, and they will continue to absorb flavors from the liquid, which can enhance their taste.

If you want to store for an extended period, freezing them is a great option. To freeze, place them and their cooking liquid in an airtight container or freezer-safe bag. Leave some space at the top of the container or bag to allow for expansion as the liquid freezes. Properly stored, frozen cooked beans can last for several months.

Canning, which involves processing cooked beans and their liquid in canning jars allows you to store at room temperature for an extended period. Follow safe canning procedures and guidelines for preserving cooked legumes of any kind.

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Peruvian Beans
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Peruvian Beans

Course Side Dish
Cuisine Mexican
Keyword beans, canary, dry beans, how to cook, peruvian
Prep Time 1 day
Cook Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Servings 8
Calories 109kcal
Author The Typical Mom

Equipment

Ingredients

Instructions

  • On the stovetop – Place dry beans into a large mixing bowl and cover with cold water, about 3" -4" above the beans. Let beans soak overnight. When beans have soaked overnight, drain and rinse well.
  • In a large stock pot or dutch oven, add bacon and cook until crispy. Remove bacon from pan and drain on paper towels. Set aside. Add onion and oil and cook until onions begin to brown. Add garlic and cook for 1 minute.
  • Stir in tomato paste, pepper and spices. Mix well. Add soaked beans, cooked bacon, and water and mix to combine. Heat over medium high heat until boiling. Cover and reduce heat to medium low, cooking beans for 1-1/2 to 2 hours or until they are as tender as you'd like.
  • In slow cooker – follow directions on our post here – Slow Cooker Ham and Beans
  • Instant Pot – follow directions on our post here – Pressure Cooker Dry Beans

Video

Nutrition Facts
Peruvian Beans
Amount Per Serving (2 oz)
Calories 109 Calories from Fat 90
% Daily Value*
Fat 10g15%
Saturated Fat 3g19%
Trans Fat 0.02g
Polyunsaturated Fat 1g
Monounsaturated Fat 5g
Cholesterol 11mg4%
Sodium 416mg18%
Potassium 91mg3%
Carbohydrates 2g1%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 1g1%
Protein 2g4%
Vitamin A 492IU10%
Vitamin C 20mg24%
Calcium 16mg2%
Iron 0.5mg3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.
Recipe Rating




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